How to Pick the Right Washing Machine

 How to Pick the Right Washing Machine

 

 

Let’s face it, buying a new washing machine isn’t much fun.
 
No matter how tough it might be to buy the perfect washer – it would really stink not to have one (literally). Or having to call the washing machine repair man all the time simply because you didn’t spend much time researching which brand to buy!
 
In fact, these devices are some of the hardest to shop for. They’re exhausting to transport, and the marketplace is saturated with countless different models and makes to choose from. Even when you get past all the confusion, you’ve still got the stress of buying something that needs to last you several years.
 
Rather than commit yourself to a life of dirty clothing or washing your underwear in the sink, why not simplify your washing machine shopping experience with this handy guide?
 
We’re going to cover the most important considerations, from efficiency and size to the constant debate about “top loaders” and “front loaders”, to help you find the perfect option.
 
Washing Machine Buyer’s Guide: Handy Guide
 
-Types of Washing Machine
Front Load
Top Load
Pros and Cons
 
-Functional Features
 Washer/Dryers
Variable Timer
Temperature control
Different Modes
Smart Control
Child lock
 
-Drum Materials
 
-Things to Do Before Buying
Measuring the space
My capacity requirements
Energy Ratings
 
-Choosing the Best Machine for You
The best brands available
What type should you buy?
What size should you buy?
Price overview

Why consider repairing your appliance rather than replacing?

Why consider repairing your appliance rather than replacing?

 

 

Of course, there will always be times when repairs are too costly and we’ll recommend replacing an item rather than trying to repair it.
 
However, far too often we’ve seen people dispose of a perfectly serviceable appliance when a minor repair would have resolved the issue.
 
Repairs mean getting a few more years use from an appliance rather than investing a great deal of money in a new one.
 
With the costs of new appliances going up, extending an appliance’s life is generally cost effective.

Why Choose Us?

Why Choose Us?

Our entire team of appliance repair technicians have been professionally trained and worked within the industry for many years. With this knowledge, skill and dedication to the sector, you can trust our technicians to complete your appliance repairs correctly the first time.
 
Since our inception over 20 years ago we have earned a strong reputation for careful workmanship matched by exceptional customer service. Our technicians pride themselves on delivering quality appliance repairs for both commercial and residential clients.

Dishwasher Tips

Dishwasher Tips

 

Leaking from under the door? Look right away for foam inside. Sometimes foam can get in a dishwasher from detergents we use to wash by hand or from rinse aids (Jet Dry). If there is foam (and it is safe to run it more without flooding the house or area underneath) try adding a tsp of cooking oil and running for a few minutes to mix the oil around and cancel out the foam. If there is still foam repeat until the foam is gone. I suggest trying this first in case it works and then you may not need an appointment.
 
Then to prevent it from happening again I suggest running the kitchen tap on hot to warm up the water and running any dishes sitting in the sink under the water to rinse off (in case someone had washed a dish by hand and got dish soap on the dishes when no one was looking). Also I suggest you avoid jet dry all together. If there is already Jet Dry in there then add water to it and run a few cycles then add water again to flush it out. Then you can use white vinegar (or cleaning vinegar) instead of jet dry in that dispenser.

Tips on maintaining a front-load washing machine

Tips on maintaining a front-load washing machine

 

 

 
Always, always use detergent made for high-efficiency (HE) machines, and use the minimum amount (more is not necessarily better). Regular detergents produce much more suds, and over time, can build up a film on the drum and hoses that become a breeding ground for mold. Read the label carefully — some detergents are marked “HE compatible,” but still produce lots of suds, which is difficult to rinse out as your high-efficiency machine uses less water, and therefore should not be used in your front-loader. We can’t stress this enough — in same cases, using the wrong detergent may even void your warranty.
 
Use less fabric softener (one teaspoon will soften a whole load). Ditto for bleach (one tablespoon for concentrated bleach, two tablespoons for regular). Remember, high-efficiency machines use less water, so less product is needed.
 
Remove finished loads immediately. Do not let damp clothes sit in the machine (this provides an ideal breeding environment for musty smells and mildew). Care should be taken to ensure pets or children don’t climb in.
 
When not in use, leave the door of the washer ajar, to improve air circulation inside the machine and to prevent the buildup of mold and mildew.
 
Clean out the washer door’s rubber seal thoroughly. Remove any bits of hair or fabric you may find — these trap odors, sludge and provide a wonderful home for mold. Wipe the inside of the drum with this solution as well.
 
For a third month cleaning session, pour some distilled white vinegar instead of laundry detergent into the dispenser, and add one cup of baking soda directly into the drum as well (this will neutralize the pH, but provide a scrubbing action). Run the machine on the hottest cycle, plus an extra rinse. For extreme cases of mildew-y smells, replace vinegar with bleach and run a few quick cycles with hot water. If there’s a self-cleaning cycle, follow your manual’s instructions on how to use it.
 
Clean out the drain pump filter every few weeks or whenever you notice problems with water drainage, excessive vibrations, wet clothes after the final spin, longer than usual cycle time, or unusual pauses during a wash cycle. Hair, fabric, and other various bits can get clogged up in the drain pump filter, leading to sluggish drainage of water. The drain pump filter’s location varies by machine (check your manual for details) but it is usually located at the front and bottom of the machine behind a small trapdoor.
 
Ensure that the spin speed you select is appropriate for the load you are washing — higher spin speeds may mean drier clothes prior to putting them in the dryer, but also means extra wear and tear on the machine’s inner parts, potentially shortening its lifespan.